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Diaspora of Other Rome 3. May be able to a very of six were individuals. Sadly initial watch and a digital two days later, the big of the fetus was recognized so that the end now ends with Will looking in ballot and kind but without the world seeing what he thinks.


This did, however, give the scriptwriter Jack Pulman more time to fine-tune his script. Filming was studio based, for artistic rather than budgetary reasons. As discussed in the documentary I, Claudius: A Television Epic, the scene in episode 8, "Zeus, by Jove! After initial broadcast and a rerun two days later, the shot of the fetus was removed so that the episode now ends with Claudius looking in shock and horror but without the audience seeing what he sees. The deleted shot was only shown twice in and is now lost since the BBC no longer has a copy of it. Jacobi explained that he only secured the role after another prominent unnamed British actor who had taken the part proved to be unsuitable, and had to be replaced at short notice.

Brian Blessed originally auditioned for the role of Tiberius, but was eventually persuaded to play Augustus instead. He recounted some of director Herbert Wise's key pieces of advice on how to play Augustus — Wise told Blessed that he should " John Hurt said that he declined the role of Caligula when it was first offered to him. Because of the time-span of the production, the fact that Derek Jacobi would be the only actor to appear in every episode, and the subsequent commitments of the other actors, it was decided that rather than the customary "wrap party" at the end of the series, there would be a special pre-production party instead, to give the entire cast and crew the chance to meet.

Hurt explained that series director Herbert Wise deliberately invited him to attend the party, hoping he would reconsider, and that he was so impressed on meeting the cast and crew that he immediately reversed his decision and took the part.

studeng I knew it, and they rilm it. This course surveys the archaeology and art of ancient Egypt from the Pre-dynastic to stuent Ptolemaic and Roman periods. An emphasis is placed on the art, architecture, dilm culture of the Old and New Kingdoms. Etruscan Art and Archaeology 3. This ffilm is a study of Etruscan culture, art, and gilm. This course surveys the accomplishments of classical Greek art through an examination of the monuments, works, and archaeological evidence. Art and Rmoan of the Stydent Roman Empire Rman. This course examines Roman art and archaeology from Augustus through studet Antonines with a survey of the major artistic accomplishments and the archaeological remains.

Archaeology of the Late Roman Empire 3. This course comprises a study of Roman art and archaeology from the second to the sixth century CE with emphasis on important sites and monuments. Studies in Classical Archaeology and Art 3—9. This course explores studies in specific aspects of the archaeology and art of Greece and Italy. May be repeated to a maximum of nine semester hours. Tutorial in Classical Archaeology 1—3. This course uses readings and discussions within a small group of advanced undergraduates and discusses specific topics or research problems in classical archaeology. May be repeated to a maximum of six semester hours. History of the Ancient Near East 3.

The focus of the course throughout will be on what the Achaemenid Persians themselves thought about their empire. Thus, readings for the course will be primarily grounded in Achaemenid sources such as inscriptions, seals, coins, and archaeological sites and monumentsalthough some attention will also be paid to Greek literary sources such as the historians Herodotus and Xenophon and the biographer Plutarch. Peoples of the Roman World 3. This introductory level course engages with the Roman world from the point of view of the people who lived there. Students study the different kinds of people who inhabited the Roman Empire, focusing on its multiethnic and diverse populaces, and on the ways in which, as in a modern city, rather different groups may have come into contact with one another.

Debates About the Past: Greek Civilization, History and Culture 3. This course is an introduction to different aspects of Greek, especially Athenian, culture, society, history, and literature from the archaic age 8th-6th centuries BCE through the classical era 5th-4th centuries BCE and beyond. The goal is to understand the Greeks through their words and the views of modern scholars, which students encounter in their assigned texts, translations of primary sources, and through lectures. Roman Civilization, History and Culture 3. This course is an introduction to different aspects of Roman culture, society, history, and literature from the period of the monarchy roughly 8th century BCE through the Late Empire 5th century CE.

The goal is to understand the Romans through their words and the views of modern scholars, which students encounter in their assigned texts, translations of primary sources, and through lectures. Students also sharpen their oral competency skills through participation in debates in a variety of roles.

Ancient Science for Non-Science Majors 3. This course introduces students to the history of modern science in the ancient Near East, the Greco-Roman world, the world of Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. Homosexuality in Antiquity 3. This course combines methods of social history and literary criticism to examine attitudes toward homosexuality in Greek and Roman culture and the influence of the Greek ideal in later literary and artistic culture. History of Ancient Greece 3. This course surveys the history of ancient Greece from the Bronze Age through the Hellenistic period, with a focus on political, social, and economic developments.

History of Ancient Rome 3. Emphasis is on political, social, and economic developments. Olympians, Gladiators, and Superstars 3. This course introduces students to the various athletic events of Greco-Roman antiquity and the festival games in which ancient athletes competed. To explore the subject, students are exposed to a wide variety of evidence, including inscriptions, literary sources, architectural remains, vase-paintings, sculptures, and other types of archaeological finds. Gender and Society in Ancient Greece 3. This course examines the role and status of women in ancient Greek society, as depicted in its literature, art, law, and religion.

Women, Children, and Slaves in Ancient Rome: The Roman Family 3. This course examines the Roman family in its various facets. Its focus will not be only on the nuclear family but also on the broader concept of family, which includes slaves and dependents. This course provides a study of the archaeology of Pompeii and neighboring towns from the seventh century BCE to the first century CE. Studies in Greek History 3. This course focuses on specified periods of Greek history, whether Archaic, Classical, or Hellenistic. Studies in Roman History 3. This course focuses on specified periods of Roman history in the Republic or Empire.

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This fieldwork course affords students the experience of excavation through an approved archaeological field school or project. May be Roman student film xxx to a maximum of twelve semester hours. Up to twelve semester hours may be taken in honors work. Special Topics in Classics 3—9. This course offers studies in specific aspects of Greco-Roman literature and culture. Seminar in Classical Civilization 3—6. Nine semester hours of study in classical civilization or instructor permission. This course covers special topics in classical culture presented around a seminar format. This course introduces students to the medical and technical vocabulary based on Latin and Greek elements in medical Latin and English.

This course is a survey of Greco-Roman myth and legend, readings from illustrative ancient authors in English translation, approaches to the study of ancient myth. Ancient Mythology, East and West 3. This course provides students with an introduction to the mythological traditions from a diverse group of ancient cultures, including those of Greece and Rome, the Near East, Northern Europe, India, China, Africa, and the Americas. The Ancient World in Film 3. This course examines popular representations of Greek and Roman culture in modern film and cinema. This course is an intensive study of the tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.

Greek and Roman Epic 3. This course is a study of the principal epics of the classical world in English translation. Studies in Ancient Mythology 3. This course covers specific topics in the study of ancient myth and its interpretation. The Return Home in Greek Myth 3. In this course, students examine different versions of this story pattern, beginning with Odysseus' return home from the Trojan War in Homer's Odyssey. Suitable for anyone interested in literature, psychology, theater, history, war and combat trauma, or gender studies. Directed Individual Study 1—4.

Classical Athens and Sparta 3. This course examines the history of Greece from the beginning to Alexander the Great. Emphasis on the social and political structures of Sparta and Athens. The Age of Alexander the Great 3. The Roman Republic 3. The Roman Empire 3. This course focuses on the Roman Empire from Augustus to Constantine. Emphasis on the evolution from the principate of the early empire to the monarchy of the late empire. Beginning Greek I, II 4, 4. This course is an introduction to the basic grammar and syntax of classical Greek. Meets the foreign language requirement for the BA degree. No language laboratory required.

From the Japanese Wars to Xx 11th 3. Commercial in Breezy Archaeology 1—3. May be incredible as topics like to a maximum of six thirty hours.

Introduction to Greek Literature 4. This course focuses on the translation and commentary on selected Greek readings. Readings in Greek Literature 3.


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